What is the best thing you read today?

What is the best thing you read today?

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1.

I found this news article through an ad feed

12-Year-old Girl Outsmarts Carjacker and Saves Little Sister by McKinley Corbley

A 12-year-old girl may not seem like much of a match for an adult carjacker – but that wasn’t the case for Maddie Weiler.

Maddie and her 7-year-old sister Molly were on the way to the Busch Gardens theme park in Virginia on Saturday when they witnessed a car accident happen right in front of their eyes.

Maddie’s mother Brandie Weiler pulled over and got out of the car in order to help the victims. After she dialed 911, however, she saw the man who caused the accident unlock the door to her car and climb into the driver’s seat.

The perpetrator, 21-year-old Paul Salsman, wasn’t expecting the beatdown that followed.

Maddie sprung into action by putting the van into drive, knowing full well that it prevented the car from starting. She then started punching Salsman as hard as she could and screaming at the top of her lungs – all to give her sister Molly enough time to get out of the car and away from the danger.

Salsman reportedly tried to steal two more cars before being arrested by police. He is currently being charged with three counts of felony carjacking, felony hit and run, and driving under the influence of drugs.

According to Fox News, Maddie is a talented horseback rider. After the incident, she told her mother: “Mama, if I can control a 1,500-pound animal, then I was sure going to try to take care of him.”

Maddie’s parents have always told the kids to resist kidnapping by lashing out and making as much noise and possible. Though she suffered a fractured growth plate in her wrist, the young hero believes that it’s a small price to pay for the safety of her family – and she encourages other girls to follow her example.

“I just went for it,” Maddie told WTKR. “Nothing passed my mind except, ‘He is a psycho and he needs to get out of the car’.”

 


2.

Have read the below article today. Interesting!

 

This is a weird but true

Never underestimate your Clients’ Complaint, no matter how funny it might seem!

This is a real story that happened between the customer of General Motors and its Customer-Care Executive. Please read on

A complaint was received by the Pontiac Division of General Motors:

This is the second time I have written you, and I don’t blame you for not answering me, because I kind of sounded crazy, but it is a fact that we have a tradition in our family of ice cream for dessert after dinner each
night. But the kind of ice cream varies so, every night, after we’ve eaten, the whole family votes on which kind of ice cream we should have and I drive down to the store to get it.

It’s also a fact that I recently purchased a new Pontiac and since then my trips to the store have created a problem. You see, every time I buy vanilla ice cream, when I start back from the store my car won’t start. If I get any other kind of ice cream, the car starts just fine.

I want you to know I’m serious about this question, no matter how silly it sounds: ‘What is there about a Pontiac that makes it not start when I get vanilla ice cream, and easy to start whenever I get any other kind?’”

The Pontiac President was understandably skeptical about the letter, but sent an engineer to check it out anyway. The latter was surprised to be greeted by a successful, obviously well educated man in a fine neighborhood. He had arranged to meet the man just after dinner time, so the two hopped into the car and drove to the ice cream store. It was vanilla ice cream that night and, sure enough, after they came back to the car, it wouldn’t start.

The engineer returned for three more nights. The first night, the man got chocolate. The car started. The second night, he got strawberry. The car started. The third night he ordered vanilla. The car failed to start.

Now the engineer, being a logical man, refused to believe that this man’s car was allergic to vanilla ice cream. He arranged, therefore, to continue his visits for as long as it took to solve the problem. And toward this end he began to take notes: he jotted down all sorts of data, time of day, type of gas used, time to drive back and forth, etc. In a short time, he had a clue: The man took less time to buy vanilla than any other flavor. Why? The answer was in the layout of the store.

Vanilla, being the most popular flavor, was in a separate case at the front of the store for quick pickup. All the other flavors were kept in the back of the store at a different counter where it took considerably longer to find the flavor and get checked out. Now the question for the engineer was why the car wouldn’t start when it took less time.

Once time became the problem — not the vanilla ice cream — the engineer quickly came up with the answer: vapor lock. It was happening every night, but the extra time taken to get the other flavors allowed the engine to cool down sufficiently to start. When the man got vanilla, the engine was still too hot for the vapor lock to dissipate.

Moral of the story: Even crazy looking problems are sometimes real and all problems seem to be simple only when we find the solution, with cool thinking.

pulkit khandelwal: